Journal article

Longitudinal predictors of informant-rated involvement of people with dementia in everyday decision-making : findings from the IDEAL program

  • Sabatini, Serena ORCID Faculty of Biomedical Sciences, Università della Svizzera italiana, Switzerland
  • Martyr, Anthony ORCID Centre for Research in Ageing and Cognitive Health, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, University of Exeter Medical School, Exeter, UK
  • Gamble, Laura D. ORCID Population Health Sciences Institute, Newcastle University, Newcastle, UK
  • Collins, Rachel Centre for Research in Ageing and Cognitive Health, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, University of Exeter Medical School, Exeter, UK
  • Matthews, Fiona E. ORCID Population Health Sciences Institute, Newcastle University, Newcastle, UK
  • Morris, Robin G. Department of Psychology, King’s College London, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, London, UK
  • Rusted, Jennifer M. ORCID School of Psychology, University of Sussex, Brighton, Brighton, UK
  • Pentecost, Claire Centre for Research in Ageing and Cognitive Health, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, University of Exeter Medical School, Exeter, UK
  • Quinn, Catherine Centre for Applied Dementia Studies, Bradford University, Bradford, UK - Wolfson Centre for Applied Health Research, Bradford, UK
  • Clare, Linda ORCID Centre for Research in Ageing and Cognitive Health, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, University of Exeter Medical School, Exeter, UK
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  • 2022
Published in:
  • Journal of applied gerontology. - 2022, vol. 42, no. 2, p. 290–301
English The extent to which people with dementia are involved in everyday decision-making is unclear. We explored informant-rated involvement of people with dementia in everyday decision-making over 2 years and whether functional, behavioral, and psychological factors related to the person with dementia and the caregiver explain variability in involvement of people with dementia in everyday decision-making. We used IDEAL data for 1182 people with dementia and their caregivers. Baseline mean score on the decision-making involvement scale was 31/45; it minimally declined over time. People with dementia who were female, single, and/or whose caregiver was younger had greater involvement in everyday decision-making than those without these characteristics. Better cognition, fewer functional difficulties, fewer neuropsychiatric symptoms, less caregiver stress, and better informant-rated relationship quality were associated with higher involvement in everyday decision-making. Cognitive and functional rehabilitation, and educational resources for caregivers, could prolong involvement of people with dementia in everyday decision-making.
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  • English
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Medicine
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CC BY
Open access status
hybrid
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https://n2t.net/ark:/12658/srd1325634
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