Journal article

Extreme sleep state misperception : from psychopathology to objective-subjective sleep measures

  • Castelnovo, Anna Sleep Medicine, Neurocenter of Southern Switzerland, Regional Hospital of Lugano, Lugano, Switzerland - Faculty of Biomedical Sciences, Università della Svizzera italiana, Switzerland - University Hospital of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland
  • Ferri, Raffaele Oasi Research Institute, IRCCS, Troina, Italy
  • Galbiati, Andrea Division of Neuroscience, Sleep Disorders Center-Neurology, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy - School of Psychology, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, Italy
  • Rossi, Alessandro Department of Philosophy, Sociology, Education, and Applied Psychology, Section of Applied Psychology, University of Padova, Padova, Italy
  • Zucconi, Marco Division of Neuroscience, Sleep Disorders Center-Neurology, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy
  • Castronovo, Vincenza Division of Neuroscience, Sleep Disorders Center-Neurology, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy
  • Strambi, Luigi-Ferini Division of Neuroscience, Sleep Disorders Center-Neurology, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy - School of Psychology, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, Italy
  • Manconi, Mauro Sleep Medicine, Neurocenter of Southern Switzerland, Regional Hospital of Lugano, Lugano, Switzerland - Faculty of Biomedical Sciences, Università della Svizzera italiana, Switzerland
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    01.07.2021
Published in:
  • International journal of psychophysiology. - Elsevier. - 2021, vol. 167, p. 77-85
English Study objectives: We tested the hypothesis that patients with extreme sleep state misperception display higher levels of psychopathology and reduced quantitative estimation abilities compared to other patients with insomnia. Secondary aims included the evaluation of group differences in subjective self-reported quality of life and sleep quality and objective sleep parameters. Methods: In this cross-sectional, observational study, 249 patients with insomnia underwent a videopolysomnography with a subsequent morning interview to assess self-reported sleep estimates and filled in a large battery of questionnaires. Patients were classified into High Misperception (HM) and Moderate Misperception (MM) groups, according to the complement of the ratio between self-reported total sleep time and objective total sleep time (Misperception Index). Results: No significant differences emerged in any of the psychopathological measures considered between the HM and the MM group. Similarly, no effect was observed in quantitative estimation abilities. HM patients displayed a significantly increased number of awakenings per hour of sleep and a reduced dream recall rate. Their overall sleep quality and quality of life was significantly impaired. Conclusions: Future research on sleep misperception should focus on factors other than the level of psychopathology and estimation abilities, in particular sleep microstructure and quantitative EEG studies in both REM and NREM sleep.
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  • English
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Medicine
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https://susi.usi.ch/usi/documents/319268
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